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Venous Stasis Ulcers

Venous stasis ulcers in the leg are often an indication that venous disease has reached an advanced stage. Because venous disease is progressive, venous reflux can often lead to additional valve failure, and as a result, the pooling of blood can affect a larger area. When blood pools in the lower leg over a long period of time, the condition is referred to as venous stasis.

When blood leaks into the tissue of the skin it can cause swelling and damage to the tissue. Tissue damage can result in wounds, or ulcers, that are chronic and do not heal if the condition is left untreated. Ulcers may be painful or itchy and often require constant care and dressing. Because ulcers do not heal on their own, they can have a significant impact on quality of life.

Often, because of a poor understanding of treatment options, people can be plagued with ulcers for years, assuming there is no alternative. While treating the source of venous disorders early can prevent ulcers, those who are already experiencing this late-stage symptom can have excellent success with treatment, and often are able to enjoy complete healing and recovery.

Expand Your Knowledge: Ulcers can occur in the elderly as well as people in their twenties. Long periods of sitting or stagnancy can cause venous reflux that leads to ulcers at any stage of life and, without treatment, can cause lifelong problems. Find out about t reatment options.

 

 

 


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